Somerville Open Studios Presents:
Beyond the Pattern - A Fashion Show

Thursday, May 4, 2017, 7:30 - 9 pm
Arts at the Armory
191 Highland Ave.
[ Directions | Map ]
Admission is free. Doors open at 6:30 pm.

Back again for its fifth year, Beyond the Pattern - A Fashion Show features a select group of local Somerville artists displaying their interpretation of wearable art. The cosmos, mythology, fantasy, world events and time travel are some themes incarnate explored by the designers. Presented on the runway, an element of performance art adds a dynamic, original quality. Grassroots by nature, the show is honest and authentic. We invite you to kick off your SOS experience with our show - enjoy it!

Seating is general admission; please arrive early for best seating choice. The Armory bar will be open, featuring local craft brews and soft drinks for your sipping pleasure. Parking is available in the lot behind the Armory, as well as on the street. If you are a Somerville resident, please give non- residents first option to use the parking lot.

Beyond the Pattern is a featured event of ArtWeek Boston, which runs from April 28 through May 7. Especially for ArtWeek visitors, this year's show will begin with a brief talk about the event's history.

Please also visit Beyond the Pattern's Facebook event page.

The Designers

Annie Blazejack, a narrative painter, has recently forayed into the realm of fashion design, hoping that this medium can help tell a story about deep space, collaborative invention, and a utopian future.

Blazejack and her frequent collaborator, Geddes Levenson, have designed and dyed a cotton fabric patterned with painterly star clusters. The space fabric re-appears in a variety of projects: it has been stretched as a painting substrate, sewn it into garments, used to build sheet forts even camping tents.

Joolie Cahill, Co-Coordinator of Beyond the Pattern 2017, has been designing under her label I am Joolienn since 2009. She's participated in Somerville Open Studios and Beyond the Pattern since it first began in 2012. She's inspired by colorful patterns and textures seen in nature and in art. She uses recycled materials and mixed media for most of her work. Feathers, ruffles and lace are a must! Check out more of her work at the Armory during SOS weekend.

This is the fourth SOS Fashion Show for JoAnne Coppolo, the sole designer and garment maker of JoJo Original Designs, a company she started in 2007.

She comes from a string of folk artists who created out of love and necessity. Since childhood she has been using fabric as her medium for artistic self expression. Moving around in the world with eyes wide open further influenced her sense of style and attraction to everything from a simply woven cloth to the exotic and flamboyant color of some indigenous textiles.

Over the decades she has honed her skills as a constructionist using fabric to "build" a garment. The challenge of putting together something that feels good, fits well and looks unique is very satisfying. She also loves to create loose, one size, flowing pieces that can be worn by any age or size.

Jen Flores has a studio at the Vernon St Studios where she uses it as her painting studio and to sell her clothing during Somerville Open Studios. She started the clothing out of want - simply not liking what was being sold. Her clothing is California influenced with rich colors, patterns and textures. She loves to use prints and mix them up into fun combinations and effects. Jen creates dresses, coats, sweaters and tops. All very casual but versatle, easy wear from day to eve.

Ana Latkovic is very passionate about bringing art to the everyday life. She treats clothes like a blank canvas - When she paints on fabric it becomes a piece of art that can be worn every day instead of just being hung on the wall. She likes simple, contemporary designs and mostly works with natural materials like silk, rayon and cotton.

 

Kimberley Pendleton - Boston Millinery: Bespoke and Limited Edition Hats and Accessories

Handmade for women who know that the finishing touch is everything.

"While clothes merely hang on a hanger, Hats whisper 'Try me on I'm beautiful...'"

About 25 years ago, while I was a fashion Student a friend asked me to make a hat for her Sister who had been diagnosed with Leukemia. Her treatment had caused her to suffer hair loss. I made my first ever hat for her and never looked back. Helping this young woman feel strong and feminine again changed my world.

The joy hats can bring, not only to those fighting cancer but to all "hatahollics" everywhere, is my joy too.

Millinery, the art of hat making, allows me to indulge my true love of fabrics. New creations spring forth all the time. My hats are made from my own patterns and carefully chosen fabrics, then hand sewn into works of art. Some simple, some extravagant.

I hope you enjoy this collection as much as I enjoyed making it!

Consuelo Perez: I believe that visual impact makes a stronger statement because we often judge things by how we see them, and we do not give them a chance.

My art can be expressed and interpreted in different ways. When I look at the trash I think to myself of the many ways that this trash can be turn into extraordinary forms of art, and what kind of food people eat.

Through this form of art I have become aware of the meaning behind the trash in different communities. While I collect trash to make art, others collect them to survive just like the biological symbiotic relationship. For example, the birds feed off of the crocodile while the crocodile is being cleaned up. They both benefit.

I do this type of art because I have control. There are issues such as abortion, where people question whether or not it is correct to give life to someone or something. I do not have to contemplate political issues because the creation of the piece is up to me, because art crosses all boundaries.

Samira Rizza: My name is Samira, it's a little hard to pronouce so Sami is fine. I live in Somerville and work in boston at an office job that drains my soul. My personal fashion aesthetic these days tends to be gothic and minmal, or as my therapist once said Hip Urban Goth Chic. The looks I like to design are a bit less minimal and very Japan street fashion inspired, but still very much on the side of goth or even punk. I'm a bit of an eclectic mixed bag, inspiration is limitless.

Sadiya Sheeba Akasha is an inspired, self taught designer from Somerville. She enjoys collaborating with clients to create custom clothing and costumery suited to the clients' desires, sense of style, and practical wearability. Sadiya Sheeba also dabbles in cosplay at local conventions translating fan based and professional character designs into the real world.